4th of July Safety Tips

More pets get lost around the 4th of July than any other time of year due to fireworks noise

  • Plan ahead and make sure your pet is microchipped. Between the months June and November we always have our microchips at a discounted price.
  • Instead of bringing your pet to the festivities this year, keep them safe and happy in a sheltered & escape-proof area at home.
  • Play some music or have the tv on to help mask the fireworks’ sounds.
  • Distract your pet with games and toys.
  • There are some good supplements that you can try. We love Pet Releaf. It is a CBD oil or yummy treats made from hemp and we are getting very good feedback from owners. We carry their entire line and any staff member can answer any questions that you may have. If that’s not enough then give us a call. There are short-term medications that we can use to relieve your pet’s anxiety.

Avoid vomiting/diarrhea & a trip to the vet

  • Never leave alcoholic drinks unattended where a pet can reach them.
  • Don’t feed/reward your pets with what you’re eating. You may pay the price all over your floor that evening.

Backyard party hazards

  • Keep matches and lighter fluid out of your pet’s reach.
  • Keep citronella candles, insect coils & oil products out of reach.
  • Do not apply sunscreen or insect repellant that is not specifically made for pets.
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posted in:  Dog & Cat Care  |  Seasonal

SUMMER CAN BE FUN…AND DEADLY

The combination of high temperature, high humidity, and poor ventilation can be fatal to dogs and cats.  These animals do not sweat as people do.  Thus, the cooling benefits of water evaporation from the skin are not available to them..  Panting and radiation of heat from the skin surface are their main means of controlling body temperature.  If the air temperature and humidity are high and air circulation is reduced, these protective mechanisms are inadequate.
Body temperature can then increase dramatically, resulting in collapse and severe shock.  Animals not treated promptly may die or brain damage may result.
Dogs with short “pushed-in” noses, such as Pugs, Bulldogs, Pekingese, and Boxers, are especially susceptible to heat stroke since their restricted breathing doesn’t allow enough air exchange for rapid heat loss.
Pets should never be left alone in a closed car, especially during the hot summer months.  Even if the window is left open a small amount, within minutes the temperature inside the car can reach over 120 degrees.  The pet’s body temperature can easily go up to 106-107 degrees under these conditions and brain damage is often the result.
Jogging with your dog during the hot summer months should also proceed with caution.  Just as you undergo a training program and work gradually up to speed, so should your dog.  Start slowly for a few minutes each day and work up.  Continual exercise in the sun without access to water can easily cause heat exhaustion in your pet.
Overweight or geriatric pets are especially prone to heat exhaustion or exercise intolerance. These pets should be checked over thoroughly by a veterinarian before starting a demanding exercise program such as jogging.
    If you must leave your pet outside during hot, humid weather, be sure to provide adequate ventilation, protection from the sun, and cool fresh water. Limit your pet’s exercise during the hottest parts of the day, and never leave your pet in a closed car. This is an invitation to tragedy.
Symptoms of heat stroke include a dazed or frantic appearance, rapid breathing, weakness, thick, ropy saliva, and bright red mucous membranes.  Quick treatment to lower the body temperature is indicated which includes immersing the entire body in cold water, or even a cold water enema in a life-threatening situation.  Any pet with heat stroke or heat exhaustion should be rushed to a veterinarian as soon as possible.
Going to the beach with your dog can also be a great experience. Bring along fresh water and offer it often. Don’t let your pet drink too much salt water; this can cause vomiting and diarrhea which may lead to dehydration. Limit the amount of time during the hottest parts of the day (11 a.m. to 2 p.m.), or provide periods of time in the shade. Also, be a good neighbor: pick up all “little presents” your dog leaves. Along Jupiter Beach there are usually doggie bag
stations to grab a bag to pick up the waste. And don’t forget that light pigmented dogs can sunburn too!
Summer can be a fun time with your pet as long as some simple precautions are taken.

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posted in:  Dog & Cat Care  |  Seasonal

Dental Care

Your pet’s dental health is extremely important! Veterinary dental care is about more than just preventing “doggy breath” – regular dental care can help prevent serious diseases and infections. Routine dental cleanings are a vital part of your pet’s preventive health care plan.

Your pet has access to the latest veterinary dental technology at our hospital. We use digital dental x-ray equipment in order to better diagnose dental conditions. There are actually about a dozen steps to a veterinary dental visit. We will discuss many of them here.

Why Dental Care Is Important
Plaque and tartar build-up on your pet’s teeth can lead to gingivitis. Reddened, bleeding gums, difficulty chewing and bad breath are all signs of gingivitis. Gingivitis can cause periodontal disease, a bacterial infection that, if left untreated, can potentially damage your pet’s kidneys, heart, and other organs. Regular dental cleanings remove plaque and tartar and prevent gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Dental problems may cause your pet to suffer from:

  • Prolonged pain
  • Tooth loss
  • Chronic infections
  • Lowered resistance
  • Possible heart, liver and kidney disease

Look for:

  • Bad breath
  • Drooling
  • Yellow or brown discolorations on teeth
  • Decreased appetite

We can provide complete and thorough dental cleaning in many pets with NO ANESTHESIA! Ask us about this special service for your pet.

 

Progressive Nature of Periodontal Disease

 Stage 1 Periodontal Disease Early Periodontal disease: Inflamed gumline — red, swollen and sometimes tender.Plaque is barely visible, but it is already present.
 Stage 2 Periodontal Disease Extensive plaque formation with tartar build-up. Inflamed gumline. Mouth is proabably sore with occasional drooling. Beginning of mouth odor.
 Stage 3 Periodontal Disease Thick tartar formation (creamy-brown hard masses on the teeth). Inflamed and partially receding gums. Periodontal disease well under way below the gumline. Mouth is sore and bad breath is present.
 Stage 4 Periodontal Disease Severe tartar formation. Inflamed and receding gumline is very sensitive. Advanced periodontal disease is present with infection, bleeding, tooth and bone loss.
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posted in:  Dog & Cat Care